CULTURAL WARFARE Guitarist KEVIN DOUGHTY – “Prince was a badass on every instrument, the ultimate artist”!

Hailing out of Oakland, California, Cultural Warfare is comprised of five seasoned musicians with common goals – Vocalist Jacques Serrano, Guitarist Billy Garoutte, Guitarist Kevin Doughty, Bassist Pete Aguilar, and Drummer Bones Padilla. Together they create music that stays true to the classic Bay Area sound of its time while creating a modern twist in the music to create a melodic yet aggressive sound within the unit. Continue reading “CULTURAL WARFARE Guitarist KEVIN DOUGHTY – “Prince was a badass on every instrument, the ultimate artist”!”

PORTRAYAL OF GUILT Drummer James Beveridge – “My dad surprised me with a kit when I turned 11”.

Emerging screamo Texans, portrayal of guilt announce a new tour beginning on February 7th in Houston, TX. Hot on the trail of their critically acclaimed new release, “Let Pain Be Your Guide”, the band will travel throughout the US for the bulk of February, joined by D.C. punks NØ Man, New Jersey grindcore outfit Fluoride, and Chicago hardcore trio Stay Asleep.

How did you first get into music? Who or what turned you onto punk?

I stole a copy of Buddha by Blink-182 out of my sister’s room one day when I was maybe 5 or 6. Up until then I had actually decided I didn’t like music for some reason, but I thought the art on that CD looked really cool so I had to give it a listen. Once I heard it and realized that I actually liked it, it was game over for me.

What got you started playing music and how old were you? How did you become a drummer?

I got interested in the drums when I was maybe 8 or 9 because my sister’s boyfriend at the time played the drums in what I guess you would call a “screamo” band. I went and saw them play at the local high school’s battle of the bands and I thought it was the coolest thing I’d ever seen (it was also the first show I had ever seen). After that I begged my parents for drums until eventually my dad surprised me with a kit when I turned 11.

Are you proficient in any other instruments? Have you always been creative?

I’ve been playing guitar for about the same amount of time as I have the drums (13 years) and yes, I would say so.

What was the local scene like where you’re from, was there a particular band you aspired to be like, favorite local bands back then, favorite local bands now?

Growing up, the scene in Austin was a lot of fun for me. There was a lot of MySpace-era metal/screamo/hardcore or whatever, but there were a ton of bands and the shows were always rowdy. Bands from San Antonio were here every weekend playing gigs and for a few years it really felt like one big community. In those days I was really into 25 Dollar Massacre, Thumbscrew and a few other random Austin bands people wouldn’t know. They were playing half-assed “spastic grindcore” and I thought it was the shit.

My favorite locals right now would have to be Street Sects, Mammoth Grinder and Impalers. There’s a ton of other great bands, but those are the ones I listen to a lot.

How did Portrayal Of Guilt come about? Where did you develop the name? Where is it derived from? What other band names were considered? How would you best describe your sound?

Matt and I were already playing in a band called Illustrations together, but had initially started this band as a heavier side project at the time. Illustrations broke up soon after so we decided to start working on this band full-time. I can’t remember what other band names might’ve been considered, but Matt also came up with the name. I would describe our sound as emotional, intense and honest.

Who living or dead is in your dream 4 piece super group?

That’s a tough one but for me, personally. I’d have to go with Jon Theodore on the drums, Armistead Smith on bass, Timmy Taylor (RIP) on vocals and Duane Denison playing guitar. All playing together in a psychedelic prog/dance punk band or something.

What kind of gear is bringing us the Portrayal Of Guilt sound?

I play a DW kit with 2 Zildjian A Sweet Rides and 12” Sabian Hi-Hats. Matt uses a Sovtek Mig-60 with a Sunn Slave out of two 4×12’s. Right now we’re using a full Sunn setup for our bass rig and we usually run our samples and noise through a Roland SP-404.

Name the one album that epitomizes your style of punk above all others?

There are a few, but I’d say one would be Tragedy – Vengeance.

Top 5 albums or songs released in the last 12 months and/or all time?

Daughters – You Won’t Get What You Want
Street Sects – The Kicking Mule
Mammoth Grinder – Cosmic Crypt
The Soft Moon – Criminal
Big Bite – S/T

You’re on a desert island and only have three albums to listen to for the rest of your life, what are they and why?

I would probably take the first three Mars Volta records because they’re long as hell and and they make me feel warm and fuzzy.

What does punk rock mean to you?

Me and my friends doing whatever the hell we feel like.

Meg Larkin of Spitting Roses – “Found a crowd who wouldn’t judge me for being a degenerate”.

Spitting Roses is a Sacramento, California based band, spawned from The Phlegmings (90’s Riot Grrl Band) and Rosey Palms. Meg Larkin plays keyboards and does many other wonderful things.

How did you first get in to music? Who or what turned you onto punk rock?

I was a super pretentious art-rock teenager. I didn’t get heavy into punk until my 20’s. I started ending up at a lot of punk shows and eventually felt like I’d found a crowd who wouldn’t judge me for being a degenerate.

What got you started playing music and how old were you?

I started playing synthesizer at 21 because I wanted to be in a band. I’m not exactly a “musician’s musician.”

Have you always been creative?

I think I’ve been able to con people into thinking I’m creative by having a distinctive look.

How did Spitting Roses come about?

All I know is that the band really hit their stride when I rolled up and blasted them in the face with my amazing musical talent.

What makes a good Spitting Roses song?

Anna yelling a bunch. Lots of yelling.

What was the first music you bought, and what have you bought more than once in different format? What is your most prized music collectible?

The first tape I bought was Ace of Base’s “The Sign” in probably 95, and have owned multiple formats of the album. I’ve bought Tragic Kingdom by No Doubt a few times. I literally wore out that tape. As far as my most prized music collectible goes, I’m very fond of my Nigel Tufnel doll, despite Spinal Tap being a fictional band.

Top 5 albums or songs released in the last 12 months and all time?

All time albums?

They Might Be Giants—John Henry

Hot Chip—Coming on Strong

Talking Heads—More Songs About Buildings and Food

The Stranglers—The Raven

Depeche Mode—Speak and Spell

Do you still buy cd’s and records or mostly use streaming sites? Which sites do you use?

I use YouTube Music primarily. I’ll buy physical media directly from touring bands, but that’s about it.

What does 2019 hold for Spitting Roses?

We’ve been lucky to get put on some great shows with no real effort on our part, so ideally we’ll do more of that. Book us—you probably know one of us!

Mickie Rat of Spitting Roses – “It’s punk rock therapy”.

Spitting Roses is a Sacramento, California based band, spawned from The Phlegmings (90’s Riot Grrl Band) and Rosey Palms. Mickie Rat plays drums and sings.

How did you first get in to music? Who or what turned you onto punk rock?

My mom loved Broadway musicals and my dad loved Opera, so there was always music playing in my house when I was growing up. My mom would always be singing some show tune or another around the house, and my dad worked at a rock venue in LA for almost my entire life, and I would hang out at work with him at the Universal Amphitheater (or Gibson Amphitheater as it was later called) and watch the bands from backstage and think how exciting it would be to do that. I’ve wanted to be in a band for as long as I can remember. Robert, my best friend in high school in the 80s turned me on to the Ramones, B-52s, Devo, Kraftwerk, and lots of other cool music. Growing up in LA listening to the Rodney on the Roq show introduced me to tons of other cool music too.

What got you started playing music and how old were you?

I didn’t actually start playing music until I was 22. I tried to take music lessons in grade school where they start you out with a recorder, but I got frustrated because I kept getting told that I wasn’t using the right technique, and trying to learn to read music was really difficult for me. I can figure out a song just by listening to it, so I could play the music correctly, but constantly being told “you’re doing it wrong” when I was playing the right notes with my own technique was frustrating. When I was in college in 1991, I discovered The Germs and the ROIR “Germicide” cassette and realized that these were people that were making up their own rules for playing music. I thought if they could do it, I could too! I started a band called The Secretions with my friends DJ and Dave, and basically taught myself how to be in a band with that band.

Have you always been creative?

My mom tells me that I was writing short stories when I was 7, so I guess that’s a yes. If I couldn’t create things, I would lose my mind. Creating is the best cheap therapy you can get.

How did Spitting Roses come about?

From 1993-1995, I was in a band called The Phlegmings with Julie Bruce, my girlfriend at the time, and Anna and a few other friends. We played out for about two years, including a nationwide tour in 1995, but then called it quits after that. A few years ago, we decided to try to start playing music again with Julie, but she eventually had to move on to other obligations so we got Anna’s friend Kerry to play bass. Meg just recently joined on keyboard and that’s added an extra layer of awesome.

How did you become a drummer? Are you proficient in any other instruments?

Proficient is a strong word, I probably wouldn’t use that, but I also play bass, and can kinda play guitar, but I haven’t played guitar much so I’m not great at it. My method of learning instruments is usually based on whatever’s needed at the time. In the Secretions, we couldn’t find a bass player so I learned how to play bass, even though I’d never played bass before. In the Phlegmings, they couldn’t find a drummer, so I figured I would make myself learn drums, also having never drummed before. It was pretty intimidating to learn to play the drums because you have to do so many different things with all of your limbs simultaneously. Around that time, my late friend Mikel Guis (an amazing drummer) gave me the best advice at that time. All he said to me was “If you can dance, you can drum.” Once that connection was made in my brain, it all suddenly made sense and I wasn’t intimidated by it anymore. I’ve never taken music lessons of any kind, and my technique is probably atrocious, but it works for me, and I’m having fun playing in a band with my friends. That’s all that really matters to me.

What makes a good Spitting Roses song?

It’s more of a who than a what, and that who would be Anna. She writes all the songs, and they are like no songs I’ve ever heard or played, and they are so beautiful to me and so much fun to play. A lot of her songs are about personal struggles or past traumas, which for me are things that make really good and powerful punk songs. Anna and I relate on that level because as songwriters, the best way we’ve found to deal with the bullshit in our lives is to write songs and scream about it. It’s punk rock therapy.

Who are some of your main influences? Who can we hear in your music?

Personally, my biggest musical influence is probably Joan Jett, both for her songwriting and her tenacity. She writes the best pissed off queer-positive punk rock songs and never lets anyone tell her what she can’t do. I’m also very influenced by the American band called X (with John and Exene) and honestly pretty obsessed with them.

As for influences on our songs, I’m sure Anna has the best answer for this because she writes the songs. I hear a lot of things in our songs, a heavy Sonic Youth influence for sure, but also some Heavens to Betsy and Bikini Kill, Breeders, Tori Amos.

What artists with a message have made you change in any particular way and what was that change?

I don’t know if any artists have actually made me change, but The Subhumans and Citizen Fish certainly made me think more about what was going on around me, and encouraged me to challenge the status quo and not just accept things because there’s so many people saying “that’s just the way it is” or “there’s nothing you can do about it.” They’ve taught me that you can change your own personal world just by challenging the way you think.

What was the first music you bought, and what have you bought more than once in different format?

The first record I ever bought was the “Take My Breath Away” single by Berlin in 1986. I loved that band and Terri Nunn’s voice. Not terribly fond of the movie it came from, but the song was great.

The album I’ve probably bought the most times in the most different formats is the X album “Under the Big Black Sun.” It’s my favorite X album. I’ve bought it on vinyl once, on CD twice because I wore out the first copy, and I also own it in MP3 form and on cassette.

What is your most prized music collectible?

I’m gonna list two things that tie for first place because I can’t decide. The first one is my 1977 Greco fender copy P-Bass, it was my first bass and it was given to me by the very first Secretions guitarist who was killed by a drunk driver shortly after we started the band. The second one is kinda weird, and it’s probably not worth anything, but it’s a cassette tape from my college years that I used when I worked at KSSU, the CSU Sacramento student run radio station. Me and some of the other DJs used to like to try and go to shows and get station ID recordings from our favorite bands. I don’t remember exactly what year it was, early 90s sometime, but Nirvana was opening for Dinosaur Jr. at The Crest Theater and I was able to get backstage and get a station ID from Kurt Cobain, who was super nice.

Top 5 albums or songs released in the last 12 months and all time?

I dunno if I can come up with all 5.

In no particular order:
¡Las Pulgas! – ¡No Pasarán! EP; They Might Be Giants – I Like Fun; Killer Couture – The Needle from the album God Forgive The Children. There’s a song or two off of the Gary Numan “Savage” album that I really dig, I know that was from 2017 but I didn’t discover it until October 2018. That’s all I can think of right now for a top 5, i know that’s only 4, but whatcha gonna do? As for the top album or song of all time, I don’t feel qualified or even able to decide that and it would take waaaaay too long to figure out. Like Anna said, there’s so much. How does one decide that?

Do you still buy cd’s and records or mostly use streaming sites? Which sites do you use?

I buy CDs and/or records mostly only if I’m at shows and I like the band that I just saw. Compared to my friends, I have the smallest vinyl collection ever, and most of that is made up of local bands or bands that I’ve seen. For everyday music listening, I usually use streaming or songs I’ve loaded onto my phone. I’m using YouTube Red right now for streaming.

What does 2019 hold for Spitting Roses?

Hopefully playing out of town more, meeting new fun bands, and recording new songs with Pat Hills at EarthTone.

Anna Dubois of Spitting Roses – “Run-DMC was my first record, I love records”.

Spitting Roses is a Sacramento, California based band, spawned from The Phlegmings (90’s Riot Grrl Band) and Rosey Palms. Anna Dubois plays guitar and sings. Continue reading “Anna Dubois of Spitting Roses – “Run-DMC was my first record, I love records”.”

Sam Rivers of SLEEPKILLERS “Sleepkillers basically is kind of like Deftones meets Helmet meets Quicksand”.

New Hard Rock outfit, SLEEPKILLERS, is bursting onto the scene straight out of Jacksonville, FL with their self-titled debut album, due out January 25, 2019. With Sam Rivers (Limp Bizkit) delivering heavy, melodic bass lines and Damien Starkey’s (Puddle of Mudd, Saliva, Burn Season) haunting, passionate vocals, the group is rounded out with Bobby Amaru (Saliva) on drums and Adam Latiff (Puddle of Mudd) on guitar.

In the video below Jennifer Black caught up with Sam Rivers (LIMP BIZKIT) and Damian Starkey (PUDDLE OF MUDD) of SLEEPKILLERS @ Aftershock 2018 in Sacramento, California.

Sam Rivers on the music of SLEEPKILLERS…”Sleepkillers basically is kind of like Deftones meets Helmet meets Quicksand, A Perfect Circle, meets everything else in the world type of thing.

Jay Briscoe of IATT “When something is a way of life for you sacrifices are an easy choice”

Philadelphia, PA’s progressive blackened death metal unit, IATT (I Am The Trireme) have signed with Swedish extreme metal label Black Lion Records! IATT will be releasing their forthcoming label debut in Spring of 2019. The band’s most recent release, an EP entitled ‘St. Vitus Dance,’ was self financed and self released by the band in April 2018. Produced and mixed by IATT’s own Joe Cantamessa and featuring artwork from the band’s resident graphic designer Alec Pezzano, the EP was made available in digital format via their official bandcamp page with a limited run of physical copies available mostly at the band’s live performances throughout the East Coast.

 

 

How did you first get into music?

To be honest I always had a deep rooted interest in music. I remember at a young age rumbling through my fathers cassette tapes and discovering Prince’s Purple Rain tape. The cover and the music pulled me in.

Who or what turned you onto metal?

I had some friends/roommates in my freshman year of college that really embraced me and showed me what metal was. The aggressive nature of metal really spoke to me and I haven’t turned back since.

What got you started playing music and how old were you?

I started playing music in Fifth grade (10) I played trumpet in my school band. From there I played throughout my school age years. At 16 I joined the Baltimore Ravens (NFL team) marching band and played in the Super Bowl.

How did you become a vocalist/bass player?

I was originally the vocalist in IATT and Joe Cantamessa (lead guitarist for IATT) taught me guitar theory on Guitar. About three years ago the band decided that we wanted to move on from our former bassist and I decided that I would like to take on bass and lead vocal duties. I tried out for the position and they welcomed me with open arms.

Are you proficient in any other instruments?

I am proficient in Trumpet and Trombone but my days are now consumed with my IATT duties.

Have you always been creative?

Yes for as long as I can remember my creativity has always been a part of me. I would compose full songs in my head with or without an instrument. Playing in a Jazz/Ragtime improvisational band really helped me translate my creativity to an actual instrument.

What was the local scene like where you’re from, was there a particular band you aspired to be like, favorite local bands back then, favorite local bands now?

When I first started going to local shows Metalcore was at the height of its existence. I was never really big into Metalcore I was more into the European bands. The local scene in our area was centered around cliques. I would have to say back then A Life Once Lost/Left to Vanish were coming along. My favorite band was The Blessed there sound was straight out of Gothenburg. My favorite local band is Windfaerer.

How did I Am The Trireme come about?

I am the Trireme formed in 2008 when Alec Pezzano and I decided to part ways with the two guitarist that we were jamming with at the time. We took an Oath and pledged to each other that we would give our all and remain dedicated to the well oiled machine known as IATT.

Where did you develop the name? Where is it derived from? What other band names were considered?

Alec Pezzano holds the credit for coming up with the name. It derived from a college course that studied ancient war ships. A Trireme is an ancient Greek warship with multiple long oars that would ram and dismantle other ships with a battering ram. I came up with the name Samsara but we chose I am the Trireme.

How would you best describe your sound?

Our sound has changed over the years but the one thing that has remained the same was the aggressive fast pace and tempo. A few constants that hold true epic riffs and dark haunting undertones. With the help of Joe Cantamessa (Lead Guitarist) IATT has implemented a Progressive approach adopting odd time signatures and a slightly different approach to achieving our sonic goals.

Who living or dead is in your dream 4 piece super group?

I would have to say that my dream 4 piece super group is an odd match but it would consist of Mike Smith (Suffocation) on drums, Paul Gilbert (Mr Big), Stanley Clark (Return to Forever) on bass and Russell Allen (Symphony X) on Vocals.

What kind of gear is bringing us the I Am The Trireme sound?

The driving percussive force and freight train behind IATT would be a 5 piece PDP concept series drum kit and Trick Dominator Pedals. The mid range haunting melodies are tone driven by Fox Bat and Red stone pickups courtesy of The Guitarmory where Joe and Alec are endorsed artist. Each guitarist sport multiple amps but for the convenience of show ready rigs Alec and Joe use the Line 6 Pod HD Pro X and the Orange CR120. Each guitarist has a collection of axes but Joe has chosen his Strandberg Boden 6 string as his recent weapon of choice and Alec uses his trusty Chapman ML3 Pro. Holding down the low rumblings of the band I use a Ibanez SR 1006 Prestige equipped with custom Bartolini pickups and punishing the crowd with my Peavey VB2 all tube bass head.

Name the one album that epitomizes your style of death metal over all others?

I would have to say that The Somberlain by Dissection epitomizes my style of Death Metal. It has every ingredient that I enjoy from progressions to aggressive melodies and it is a time less masterpiece.

Top 5 albums or songs released in the last 12 months and/or all time?

Top 5 2018

  1. Obscura – Diluvium
  2. Beyond Creation – Algorythm

  3. Uada – Cult of a Dying Sun

  4. Gorod – Aethra

  5. The Breathing Process – Samsara

Honorable mention: Windfaerer – Alma

You’re on a desert island and only have three albums to listen to for the rest of your life, what are they and why?

If I was stuck on a desert island the three albums that I would listen to are Relayer by Yes, The Somberlain by Dissection and Scenes from a memory by Dream Theatre. I selected these three albums because they are some of my all time favorite albums.

What does metal mean to you?

To use the cliche term Metal is a way of life is an understatement. IATT is a very demanding and a time consuming entity but I wouldn’t have it any other way. We are a very self sufficient band so a lot of the video footage, audio production, booking and artwork design comes from the band itself. This can be very taxing so it is important to know our limits because we also have to focus on writing and executing our music.

Outside of IATT going to shows and supporting others is a must to stay relevant in the local scene. Making connections is a key to success and opening up and becoming more social has become vital for IATT to take the next step. When something is a way of life for you sacrifices are an easy choice.